Without Facebook

I’ve been thinking about writing this post for about a year. It was going to be called, “Six Months Without Facebook”. Six months turned into a year and I told myself, “A Year Without Facebook” would be a suitable title.

But that never happened and now we’re sixteen months along since I deactivated my Facebook account in July of 2017. So why isn’t this post called, “Sixteen Months Without Facebook”?

Simple answer, really.

I decided that “Sixteen Months” is a phrase reserved for parents with 16-month-olds and I didn’t want to intrude on their exclusive lexicon.

I am not With Child. I am Without Facebook. There’s a U2 joke in here someone, I can sense it.

Maybe I overthought this whole thing. Overthinking may or may not be a theme throughout this post.

That being said, welcome to: “Without Facebook”.

Have you ever noticed that we live in two worlds at the same time?

There’s the default world. It’s the one where we wake up in the morning, slowly open our eyes, and then slam them shut as soon as they’re exposed to bright lights.

Then there’s that other world. It’s the one that doesn’t exist unless we look at a screen. That one seems friendlier – you can adjust the brightness.

I didn’t join Facebook until after I graduated high school, which means I was probably a little naive to a lot of the stuff going on around me at the time.

My mild naiveté was confirmed many years later when my sister got me into teen dramas like The OC and One Tree Hill, where I got to see the other side of the high school experience.

My eight years on Facebook were fine. I’m not going to sit here and act like I didn’t enjoy it, or that I didn’t look forward to creating status updates that would generate “likes” or “comments”.

In fact, Facebook was probably a stepping stone to me starting this blog because that’s when I realized how much fun it is to play with words and there was an audience for my antics.

Now, you can call it being a contrarian, being unique, or a life motto, but I hate doing what other people are doing. At the same time, I think I have the ability to say what everyone else is thinking, without being offensive.

Within that credence, I found my personality and my voice, and I put it on display on Facebook.

I distinctly remember one day when BBM was down on BlackBerry – such simpler times – and there were at least five Facebook statuses complaining about BBM being down, as if it was the end of the world.

And I’m sitting there with my BlackBerry thinking, “They can still send regular text messages to every person on their BBM list, why is this a national crisis?”

So I put up a status about it, where I basically said, “Calm down, shut up, and (something about being thankful)” because this was just days after Thanksgiving.

Immediately, I got support and the almighty “Preach!” comment. And I’m thinking, if everyone agrees with me, why am I the first to say something?

Are we all just tip-toeing around statuses we don’t agree with and making comments in our head, that help us form an updated opinion of our “friend” every time they share something?

I guess so. But that’s Facebook. That’s social media.

Social media is a house built on communication, but our silence pays the rent.

Have you ever thought about that? As we scroll, our minds jump from one status, or photo, to the next in a split second and a new thought appears in our head, linking the content to a person.

It’s not like reading a book where every word builds on the last and an image is developed in our mind. Social media forces us to hop all over the place, like we’re on a trampoline at a 7-year-old’s birthday party.

That’s a lot of hopping. Anyone need a chuck bucket?

I always appreciated the people who would share something funny in their status because that’s what I tried to do most of the time. If you’re going to be the voice in someone’s head, you might as well be a funny voice, right?

We’re all throwing darts of information into someone else’s head, every time we post something. So why not throw a dart of positivity, or truth, or humour, or vulnerability, or something we’re passionate about?

Instead, we have people leaving inappropriate comments all over the place, or using the latest trendy responses like, “Weird flex but ok”. Those four words are so sad.

I guarantee we all come across at least one moron on social media every single day.

My friends, it isn’t that hard. The beauty of typing words is that you can delete them before sending. You can censor yourself. You can, dare I say, EDIT.

We don’t need an edit button on Twitter, we just need competent people who take four seconds to proofread. There, I said it.

Back to Facebook, before I get carried away.

Somewhere along the way, I realized I no longer cared about every single one of my 373 Facebook friends. I mean, I wish everyone well – health and happiness and all that.

But what’s the long-term plan here? Am I supposed to eavesdrop on your life forever? Am I supposed to be really careful not to hit the like button on your status because we haven’t talked in five years and seeing a notification from me would be weird?

What are we doing here?

It’s just a game of Duck, Duck, Goose where no one ever calls, “Goose”.

For so long, I felt guilty about unfriending anyone, so I wouldn’t. A couple of people would unfriend me and I’d always want to know why. What did I do? We sat near each other in our seminar class, once a week for 50 minutes for 12 weeks, did that mean nothing to you?

Sounds silly, right? It was supposed to.

I finally went on a mass unfriending spree a few months before deactivating my account. I cut my friend list down to about 150, which was still way too many but I started to feel guilty about the whole thing and didn’t want people to think they did something wrong should they realize I unfriended them.

There’s that overthinking again.

Multiple things contributed to my decision to deactivate Facebook. You probably expect me to list them, but I’m not going to.

As a whole, my reason for leaving can be summed up with a simple, “I was tired of it.”

My one regret is I didn’t save any of my photos, which means if I want them, I have to reactivate my account and save them one at a time before anyone realizes my account is back up. That’s probably a solo mission in the middle of the night.

Overthinking for $600, Alex.

Will I ever go back to Facebook? Maybe, someday. I don’t really miss it, though. I deleted it off my phone and don’t think about it.

When you have Facebook, it’s almost an instinct to check it every time you pick up your phone. But if it’s not on your phone, you can’t check it and that instinct fades away.

I don’t like having too many apps – I’m at a whopping three: Instagram, WordPress, and Twitter. What are you supposed to do with more than that?

Instagram is where I post the same type of photos every year and hope no one notices. The bloggers who I have let into that world probably just rushed over to see what I’m talking about.

WordPress is where I make every blog post way too long, but don’t care.

Twitter is my favourite.

Here’s the thing with Twitter. I had a personal account for six years until I started one for this blog last year. Since I did that, I haven’t tweeted anything on my personal one because it’s way more fun interacting with people I’ve never met than it is being followed by people I no longer talk to.

My old Twitter account felt too much like Facebook – a group of people I don’t really know anymore, but are there to read my every thought. That feels awkward to me.

At the start of this year, I told myself I’d only tweet and retweet things that made me happy. That’s a pretty broad banner because sometimes I just tweet out random dreams I have, or complaints about the NHL’s ridiculous playoff format.

Somebody hold me back.

It’s so easy to share negative thoughts – my goal was to do the opposite and hopefully give people a break from some of the sewage they scroll through.

So with Instagram, WordPress, and Twitter filling my needs, Facebook felt redundant.

I was also getting uncomfortable with how a private account felt so public. Why does my reply to someone’s post on my wall need to be publicized on all of my friends’ news feed?

I digress.

If you’ve ever thought about deactivating your Facebook account, I say give it a try. If you miss it too much, all you have to do is sign in and your account is back. They make it really easy for you to return.

They also try and make it hard for you to leave.

No joke, in a last ditch attempt to persuade you to stay, Facebook lists the names of a few of your friends and says they will miss you if you decide to deactivate.

Hysterical.

I’ve gone on long enough. I’ll end with this:

Social media is a referendum on your decency as a human being. Don’t be an idiot, people will know.

“You don’t have to do what everyone else is doing.”

Have you ever thought about leaving Facebook? What annoys you about social media? Which social media platform is your favourite and why?

Questions, Comments, Concerns?

Advertisements

About Paul

I think of my blog as an all-you-can-read buffet. There's something for everyone and complimentary mints at the door as you leave.
This entry was posted in Life and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

68 Responses to Without Facebook

  1. I just wrote about this on my blog. My reasoning is (slightly) different, but I am strongly considering getting rid of my Facebook account as well.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Paul says:

      Awesome. Thanks for reading! Just a heads up, your blog name links to your former blog (I believe). If you want to fix it, click on your profile pic in the top right corner, click Account Settings, and then edit your web address. Hope that helps!

      Like

  2. rebbit7 says:

    After reading your post, Paul, I thought about my own relationship with FB. I’ve had it for almost ten years, and I remember it being so much different than it is today. I feel like FB has become basically a dump-board for memes and viral videos, and less about actual status posts with ideas to share. Comments are usually tagging people or one-liners like “yas” and “preach.” I basically use FB now to stay in touch with people (via Messenger), or just stalk them in my free time (not very good, but that’s an indirect purpose FB was created for). Your idea to deactivate FB sounds like a really good idea, and I might consider doing that soon, just to see what it feels like waking up and not having a million FB notifications to check. Thanks for the inspiration, and it seems that your time off FB is doing wonders for you!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Paul says:

      Thanks for this comment – you hit the nail on the head. It is a dump board for memes and viral videos and cliche comments. I hated that aspect of it. It used to be a fun place for statuses and photos, now it’s just like a garage sale of used items.

      Liked by 3 people

  3. ellem63 says:

    I don’t care that the post was long – it was thoroughly enjoyable to read, and I laughed at your ‘solo mission’ of saving your photographs in the middle of the night. 😀 That’s something I would do too. I’ve been Facebookless for about a couple of years and it is such a relief to be free from it, and I could never get the hang of Twitter. My only social media platform is here on WordPress. I like it especially because of the diversity of people I encounter and the interesting, fun, thoughtful and educating posts. There’s something to be learned every day here.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Paul says:

      Thank you for saying that! I always justify these long posts by saying to myself that at least one person enjoys them. It is such a relief to be without Facebook. I also enjoy WordPress – I’ve made so many friends on here. No other social media platform is so welcoming. Thanks for commenting!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Ally Bean says:

    I left FB, deleting my account entirely, about five years ago. I’ve never regretted it because the reality is if someone can only be your friend there, then that person isn’t really your friend. So why bother with them? [How’s that for contrarian? Or as I like to think of it, getting real!]

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I think you hit the nail on the head here Paul when you said you knew how to do social media without offending anyone. This week on my blog had taught me a lot about the importance of phrasing words in a way that gets your opinion across without compromising what you are trying to say, but also saying it in a respectful way.

    I’m not a fan of Facebook anymore. I deleted my account in university for about 6 months but then what do you do when you don’t get any invites to anything because your friends will literally only use Facebook? Or you’re moving half way around the world and the only way to communicate with people is through Facebook? I rejoined reluctantly but it meant I was able to still talk to those people I wanted to. I’ve been slowly getting off my account lately, but again, its the only way I have connection with some people so I keep it. Mostly just for the chat function. I don’t have the app on my phone any more which is amazing! I haven’t made a status update since the start of the summer, and since July I’ve shared one picture from my Instagram there. I check my account like once every 3 weeks and I love it. There’s way too much drama on Facebook (basically any social media really) and I’m glad to have some distance from that!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Paul says:

      I noticed that guy causing a disturbance in your comments! I wanted to say something but he didn’t seem like a reasonable person so there was no point engaging. I think he missed your point completely and just loves playing the role of internet troll.

      Oh yeah, it’s weird when people act like they’re unable to tell you about any plans because “It’s on Facebook”. I’m still sad MSN Messenger isn’t a thing anymore. That’s really all we ever needed – just the chat function. There was no pressure to post anything.

      Liked by 1 person

      • lol he was totally unreasonable. But Ely found his comment and he got a full dose of her Elyness haha! I tried to ignore him but my attempt to delete his first comment didn’t work and then it all exploded. He totally missed the point and then linked my post to something he wrote which also totally missed the point. But he was my first troll! Such an experience!

        And this is so true!! MSN messenger was all we ever needed! Ooo those were the good old days! Taking forever to plan the auto “I’m away right now” line that would go out to people, or changing your name on it every few hours with new cool “graphics” ~*~I’m AwAy FrOm ThE cOmPuTeR~*~

        Liked by 1 person

      • Paul says:

        I feel like I just got smacked in the face with nostalgia after reading that paragraph about MSN. It was the best. My friend and I would “Appear Offline” and just talk there so no one else would start a conversation with us lol

        I saw Ely swoop in! You’re in good hands with her. I have her fight all my battles with others (haven’t had any yet, but still).

        Liked by 1 person

      • Haha!! I used to do the same with my friends!

        And Ely is the best! She’ll have your back whenever you have any battles! And since she did me a solid, I’ll hold her hoops while she does that

        Liked by 2 people

      • Ely says:

        Lol!!!! Anything for you my pretty little hippo loving friend! You guys can always stand back and wait for
        Me to swoop in with my foul-mouth and my “don’t fuck with my friends” cape. LOL I actually shut him up once I read on his blog he hadn’t had a date in “decades” HAAAA. A little research goes a long way! Anyways! I love you guys! Please never ever leave me in this blog world alone!!! I’m coming to Canada one day just to meet you guys and it will be all the awkwardness EVER hahahahahah

        Liked by 2 people

      • LOL I think he hadn’t had a date in decades cos he’s married Ely!! Lol but I loved how you cut him down! 😘 and YES! Come to Toronto!

        Liked by 2 people

      • Paul says:

        LOL WHAT A PLOT TWIST

        Liked by 1 person

      • I know! Haha I was shocked

        Liked by 1 person

      • Ely says:

        Oh well! lol he’s still miserable, married or not. Marriage doesn’t always equal happiness anyways hahaha. You’re too sweet for your own good after what an ass he was! You’re a great human!!!

        Liked by 2 people

      • Awww I love you Ely! Can I marry you? Will your husband mind? I know you just got married but you can do it again, right?

        Liked by 2 people

      • Ely says:

        LOL yes! Lmao I’d do it again just for you!!!

        Liked by 2 people

  6. micqu says:

    Oh the parallels… I deactivated Facebook six months ago. (I think, give or take a month.) I haven’t missed it and truth be told, it took a long while until anyone noticed that I was gone. I use 4 apps daily. Instagram, Twitter, WordPress, and Messenger. Yes, Messenger works without Facebook. (but I can’t change my profile pic.)
    I grew tired of Facebook, to be honest. (I wanted to write ‘frank’ but I am Cathy and saying I am Frank is just weird…)
    Sometimes it feels as if I don’t exist without Facebook. Countless times I was asked if I had seen this or that on Facebook and when I replied that I hadn’t because I deactivated my account, I was made to feel like an alien. I don’t miss it and I will probably never use it again. As for Instagram, I am using it less and less too, because real life acquaintances are following my account, and it makes me censor myself and my thoughts a lot more. My favourite is still Twitter. For various reasons too, but truth me told, I don’t have many followers anywhere.
    On a good day, I’d say that I am a hidden gem. On a bad day, I’d say that no one cares anyway. Maybe there is some truth in both.

    (Oh and I use WhatsApp… But that doesn’t count as social media, does it?)

    Liked by 2 people

    • Paul says:

      When I left, I told two people just so we could move our direct messages over to Twitter, but it took about 2 months before anyone asked me “Did you delete Facebook?”

      I refused to download Messenger because I thought it was dumb that they separated it from the Facebook app. I can be petty sometimes lol.

      Haha “to be frank”.

      Oh yes, I know that “alien” feeling too. It’s like we’re telling someone we decided to stop eating food. Some people just can’t fathom life without Facebook.

      I think all most of us really want is a messaging platform, WhatsApp seems to be a good option.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Jess says:

    Love the question – what’s our ultimate goal here? It’s so true. Facebook is just a place to kill some time, minus people with small businesses or communicating for work purposes. There’s also SO many fake accounts on all social media platforms that in the end, you’re not accomplishing a whole lot.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Paul says:

      It is a waste of time, especially when I already have Twitter and Instagram. I kinda feel bad for the people who use Facebook for business/work because they’re taking it seriously while almost everyone else is just there to troll the comments section, share memes, and say dumb stuff.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Jess says:

        Exactly. I never get much traffic for my business so I really don’t pay much attention to it anyways 😂 it’s like the same two people who like/comment on them.

        Liked by 1 person

  8. peckapalooza says:

    Pretty much the entire time I worked for my church and handled their social media accounts, I swore that I’d get rid of my Facebook account if my job didn’t require so much devotion to the platform. Now I’m not working there anymore and I still have Facebook. I’m definitely not on it as much, but I haven’t pulled the trigger to get rid of the thing yet. It’s only been a month, so maybe it’s just a bridge I’ve yet to cross and I’ll get there eventually. Maybe I’ll just be lazy and stop checking it and get kicked off for extreme non-use. Whatever the case, my first step should probably just be to get rid of the app on my phone. It takes up so much space!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Tony Burgess says:

    My question is if Facebook becomes too much for the mass public and people defect from it in droves what will replace it for many people. Now I think is the time for a suitable replacement to make itself known and established.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I love this so much. I feel like I’m in an abusive relationship with Facebook. I hate it and it makes me sad, but I keep going back. I’ve left for short spurts of time, but never deactivated. I usually unfollow everyone and then just have memes in my newsfeed until I can tolerate people again and I start following them.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Paul says:

      Haha so what you’re saying is your relationship with Facebook can be classified as “It’s Complicated”? “Until I can tolerate people again” – that is wonderful. I like how Facebook always suggests new friends to add, as if we want more chaos on our news feed.

      Liked by 2 people

  11. Laura says:

    “Social media is a house built on communication, but our silence pays the rent.” This one knocked me senseless, Paul. I’ll be thinking about it for a while which kind of sucks since it’s almost midnight & sleep should be happening.
    My app trackers used to say I spent most of my time on Facebook — now it’s more likely Instagram or Twitter but I still use FB. I think there’s a fair number of people who “follow” my blog by watching what I share instead of signing up through WordPress & I’d hate giving that up…

    Liked by 2 people

    • Paul says:

      You picked out my favourite quote in this post! Hope it didn’t keep you up too long.

      That’s one thing I kind of miss from not having Facebook – the little bump in views I’d get whenever I posted my blog on there. But over the years I noticed fewer and fewer people clicked on my links and it was getting to the point where I felt like no one cared anymore.

      Like

  12. Meg says:

    I’m still not allowed to have social media other than my blog, and I honestly don’t mind. I think social media can really waste a lot of time that would be better spent actually interacting with people. Great post 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Paul says:

      Thank you! That’s a good mindset to have, though I will say about 5-7 years ago Facebook was a really fun place to interact and it wasn’t congested with memes or people trying to force you to watch something. I don’t think FB will ever get back to those ways and will probably go downhill because of it (and other reasons).

      Liked by 1 person

      • Meg says:

        Right now a lot of social media platforms seem to be congested with selfies, memes, etc. It’s not actually social anymore; it seems more like people are just trying to get others to notice them rather than actually interacting with one another.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. Becky Turner says:

    I got my Facebook account sophomore year of college and have had about the same ~250 friends since. Which I’m fine with. I check Facebook once a day (I check Twitter and Instagram much much more), and I think I’d be fine without having one. But I run the FB page for the ice cream shop and my personal account has admin rights, so I still kind of need my FB account to run the page. I don’t post statuses; I update my profile picture like four times a year, and I share sports posts but even that’s rare. I’m a very boring FB friend to have.

    We keep having the discussion at work that FB isn’t getting traction like it used to, and people (in our case, students) are going to other platforms. FB is becoming very advertisement oriented (coming from the person who knows how to make FB ads), and after the whole 2016 election thing and how FB handled that plus the data breaches, it sometimes doesn’t seem worth it.

    The one thing I keep thinking about is that people always say FB and Google have all of our data and information. (Plus my FBI agent who is very bored with my boring life.) How come people don’t say that Twitter or Instagram have all of our personal information? Is it based on how the platform is set up and what information you have to supply? Or does it have to do with what you interact with on the platform and then the algorithm does all the work? (I’m not even sure if this question makes sense?)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Paul says:

      Twitter and Instagram are basically what would happen if Facebook were divided in two. Twitter is for words (mainly) and IG is for photos. I think both of those platforms are easier and have better unwritten rules. Like we can tweet as much as we want in a day, whereas with Facebook that’s frowned upon.

      I applaud you for holding out on Facebook until your sophomore year. Before you joined, did you have friends continuously telling you to get it?

      Yeah, I don’t know why people don’t say that about Instagram – Facebook owns them. I think the data Facebook has on us is the info we give it through our profile, as well as the things we post/comment. They probably have a broad profile on all of us so they can attract advertisers. Also, I read a few years ago that if you type out a status but don’t post it, Facebook still somehow tracks what you wrote. That’s creepy isn’t it? But Facebook will always be like “We just want to connect people and make interactions better!” and it all just feels like a cover up. I’m pretty sure we don’t sit around thinking, “Man, I was FB was a better place to interact.”

      Side note: I like how you alluded to the FBI agent that tracks you.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Becky Turner says:

        You make a good point about Twitter and Instagram, and they do have unwritten rules. Although I think you can tweet multiple times a day, posting more than once a day on Instagram is like a no-no. Not sure where that originated or why.

        Eh, kind of. But in high school one of my friends gave me her password and I could creep on people on her FB account. But maybe it’s because I didn’t have too many friends so I didn’t hear too much from people saying I needed one.

        Since I know how to make FB ads, it is kind of creepy how much information FB has and how the ads can be targeted. Obviously by age, gender, location, etc., but also by interests, job roles, political leaning, and more. FB is trying to go back to its roots in like “You can interact with your family!” and changing the algorithm so that you see more of posts you want to see (like family/friends original posts) but it’s too infiltrated with ads and other things. It’s not appealing anymore.

        Yes, I feel bad for him or her because I’m really boring and just yell about sports.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Paul says:

        You’re right about Instagram and posting too often. It’s almost like you have to wait a week or two before it’s acceptable to post again. I don’t like how IG shuffles the posts and bury recent ones at the bottom. All these sites with algorithms don’t realize that back when the posts were in order, we’d just scroll down as far as we left off so we knew we didn’t miss anything.

        Liked by 1 person

  14. Bryan Fagan says:

    For me it all comes down to how I feel about things.

    If I have a good feeling about you, I want to hang out with you. That’s how I feel with social media. I like Twitter. I want to hang out with Twitter but Facebook and I do not always see I to eye.But for now I have to be with Facebook. Call it a partnership.

    I had this conversation on Twitter a while back. I have the coolest bunch of people on Twitter. They are fun, smart and most of all they act their age. Facebook…..no on every level.

    I will probably join you in the ranks of former Facebook users. Sadly, it will have to wait.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Paul says:

      I like how you worded this. For me, it’s all about how I feel about things too. Twitter is a generally fun place, and the people who are a disturbance can be easily avoided.

      Ever since I got WordPress, I’ve been shocked at how friendly everyone is because the internet is known for mean, hostile people, but not here.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Bryan Fagan says:

        The best social media is the creation of my blog. I have met to best people while avoiding the not so best. I learned from the experts not to use your actual name when coming up with a blog title. Smart move. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  15. Barb Knowles says:

    “There’s the default world. It’s the one where we wake up in the morning, slowly open our eyes, and then slam them shut as soon as they’re exposed to bright lights.” Incredibly, insightfully on the money. I think I made up a word because it has the squiggly red underline.

    I, too, have been thinking of giving up facebook but since the blog and anything else I may publish is on there, I have been loath to do so. I completely ignore (or almost completely) the political posts which have been out of control in the US.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Paul says:

      “Insightfully” – I liked it, let’s put it in the dictionary.

      I’d really like to know the mindset and motivation behind people who post about politics every day. What do they think they’re getting out of it? Or is that just how they relieve themselves of stress?

      Most seem to be in your position – wanting to give up FB but having one thing that keeps them holding on.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Loving the fact that the first post I read after coming back on here was yours!
    Great post as always, and I’m so looking forward to reading more!

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Ely says:

    Sigh. Facebook is evil. At this point, I don’t even want to rant on there because that’s what my blog is for! TBH?! It reminds me of important birthdays that I would NEVER remember without a reminder of some kind! Facebook birthday reminders have saved my life.
    I’m the WORST at remembering birthdays. Besides this? It can rot in social media hell.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Paul says:

      That is true, it really saves us from the whole “you forgot my birthday” thing. I’ve noticed since I deactivated Facebook that some friends are a few days off in wishing me a happy birthday. It makes me sad and I cry. Hahahah not really. Ok maybe just internal. I’m going to stop now.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Ely says:

        Lol! If I had these things written down I wouldn’t have to rely on FB. But I change my planners out more than any normal human possibly could and I just don’t trust my phone because things happen to phones. Not sure what I’m trying to prove to myself here LOL. But I failed.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Paul says:

        Hahaha I think you’re trying to prove that you’re a bit more extra than everyone else. I understand lol

        Liked by 1 person

  18. Sarah Warsi says:

    Oh boy, I have had a love/hate relationship with facebook for many years! I have gone on and off of it many times. Now the account that I do have, I keep strictly for promoting my blog and just sharing content that might be of value to the general public. I don’t post anything personal because I find that it’s gone down in value as a medium to post personal content on. I’m not a fan in general of sharing too much personal stuff online, but if I do, I prefer Instagram over any platform because it’s just simple, photo sharing with no bell and whistles. Plus with facebook’s many data breaches and privacy concerns, their credibility has been quite shot in the last little while. Another reason I keep a facebook account is to keep in touch with family/friends that are long distance because there is no other way to communicate with them. But kudos to you for staying off of it for this long! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • Paul says:

      It used to be such a great platform for sharing things, whether a funny status or photos, but you’re right it has gown downhill. I think part of it is people just got tired of sharing stuff. The data breaches don’t help and neither do the target ads or the out of order news feed. It all just feels like we’re being force fed things we don’t want. I totally understand your reasons for still being on Facebook! Honestly, I never thought I’d last this long without it. Thanks for the comment, Sarah!

      Liked by 2 people

  19. Anna says:

    Kudos to you for surviving six months without Facebook

    Liked by 1 person

  20. webbermd says:

    Paul, nice blog. I left FB this past July permanently and was seeing if other people have left the platform too. I kind of miss it, and then I think of how manipulated my newsfeed was and then I don’t. If you want all your pictures, even the pictures you’re tagged in, download your archive folder. Everything is in there and I mean everything.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Paul says:

      Ohhh that’s a great idea, thank you! Honestly, I thought I would miss Facebook more than I have. There are days when I don’t even remember it exists.

      Like

  21. I hear you loud and clear. I’ve had my ups and downs with Facebook too. I left twitter years ago and never looked back. I left Instagram too because
    A) wasted too much time looking at things that didn’t help me mentally. If anything, it gave me self image issues.
    B)There is too many fake and altered things on Instagram and I got tired of it consuming my homepage. Even if I didn’t follow it, it somehow managed to show up there. Also, I really miss my blackberry pearl! I’m trying to buy on online and scrap the iPhone.
    Facebook I’ve tired to breakup with. I’ve been successful for about a month at a time. But sadly, that’s the only way to keep connected with people when you live on the other side of the country. People don’t use text anymore! The only way to know these days if people are alive and well is knowing they were active on FB liking
    Or commenting on stuff. It’s the sad reality of 2018.. but I feel it will only get worse. Can’t believe you still use twitter! Haha it’s too loaded for me. Just a bunch of angry people yelling at politicians and the consumer markets! I’m so glad to see you are still blogging and being truly successful with it 🙂 hope all is well!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Paul says:

      Jenna!! It’s so good to hear from you! I’m well, I hope you are too! I always get excited when I see you pop up in my notifications. I noticed you posted something too and I’ve been meaning to read it but all of a sudden I can’t access my Reader online – I think I need to do updates or something – but I think you got a new web address too? I can’t get to your blog by clicking your name in a notification. To fix that you can go to your Profile and then Account Settings and edit your web address.

      I don’t blame you for leaving Twitter or Instagram. Lately I’ve been very selective of the things/people I want to follow because all of it has an impact mentally and not always good. Yeah, it’s crazy how reliant we are on Facebook to stay in touch. I feel like I don’t know what anyone is up to anymore unless they post a filtered photo on Instagram. As for Twitter, I started a new one for this blog and it’s actually fun because my followers are other bloggers/positive people and I can just share jokes or things I like.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Thanks for telling me how to fix that! Yeah, I stoped paying for the subscription like 3 years ago for my personal URL. You started a new twitter? Jeez how do you keep track of all these things?? That’s great though! Your feedback is always positive and supportive so there is no surprise that your twitter wouldn’t be the same 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  22. Yeah, I have deleted, not just deactivated, my Facebook account I think three times now and rejoined months later. And I’m once again thinking of quitting it. I go back and forth. I really like and prefer Twitter: it’s simple, it’s public, I meet interesting people there. Your post gives me more to think about. Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Paul says:

      Thanks for reading! Facebook seems to have a magnetic pull with us and I’m not sure why. We lived perfectly normal lives before we got it, so why not after? I agree, Twitter is so much pressure. Not as many unwritten rules, either.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I think Twitter feels like I have less invested in it, so it’s easier to have fun with it and not worry about it. Plus connecting with people I don’t know seems more promising. It could be the allire of something/someone always new.

        Liked by 1 person

  23. I have Facebook now but I rarely post anything on it. I deactivated my account to take a break several years ago and my break turned in to six years. Not sure why I came back when I really didn’t miss it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Paul says:

      I know what you mean. I’ve been away for a year and a half now and don’t miss it, though I know the day will come that I return to it. It’s got a hold on us.

      Thanks for participating in my “Share Your Blog” post today!

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.