The “Link in Bio” Generation

Writing is a lonely experience for me. I sit at my desk in the middle of the night with the lights off, listening to the same song on repeat for two hours, while staring at a laptop screen, whose brightness is probably further deteriorating my already myopic vision.

It is a process that is rarely broken.

I can’t even listen to a podcast while I write because their voice clashes with the one in my head and I can’t pay attention to both.

It’s almost as if I’ve created a bubble for myself – a place where only I exist. Nothing is happening in the world, except for the movement of my fingers on a keyboard.

Are other people this particular? Or is this too Dan-Humphrey-in-Gossip-Girl for you?

Truthfully, I love it. Push come to shove, I could write at any hour of the day. But there’s something about the middle of the night. It gives me the freedom to say anything, uninterrupted.

It makes me happy.

When I hit “Publish” and go to sleep, that is my way of transferring my happiness to you – my audience. Though my name might be at the bottom, the blog post is no longer mine, it’s ours.

Words have the ability to bring people together. They just do.

Remember that, because now I’m going to go into a story that will probably be long-winded.

I’ve been fortunate enough to have my blog featured five times by WordPress, whether it was on Freshly Pressed or Discover. Then I’ll come on here and write a post about how I’ve been featured.

You’ll congratulate me in the comments, I’ll say “Thank you!”, and then wonder if I’m just spiking the football and rubbing it in people’s faces that I got featured again and my blog friends didn’t.

Though being featured is wonderful, I’ve never told anyone about the emptiness that comes with it.

The last four times I’ve been featured, there was a period of emptiness before I found any joy. How I found the joy differed each time.

The emptiness came from the fact that I didn’t know who to tell first, that I had been featured. I feel like we all have that person we’re supposed to jump around with when we get good news, I didn’t know who that was.

When I was featured the first time, I had that. I had all my friends from school who I was still in close contact with. There was immediate joy.

But then we slowly started drifting apart and a text message from me saying, “I’m getting featured on WordPress!!!” just didn’t feel right.

So I’d resort to a Facebook post and fill the void that way, by waiting for likes and comments. In 2014, likes and comments gave me the joy I was looking for.

You’re probably wondering, “Paul, don’t you have a best friend you can tell?” I do. His name is Chris and he also has a blog. Truthfully, he’s always one of the first people I tell, if not the first.

However, since he’s also a blogger, I feel like I’m telling one of my own. You know? The emptiness was only filled by telling non-bloggers.

Maybe I was desperate for recognition. Maybe I just wanted my words to mean something to people who didn’t read them on a regular basis.

Last July, I deactivated my Facebook account. Two days later, I was getting featured on WordPress for the fourth time. You know what I did? I reactivated my account, just so I could share my blog post and deliver the news.

Why? I had to fill the emptiness. I had to cast a net to look for validation from people who aren’t in the blogging world.

At that point, whether they liked or commented on my Facebook post or not, all I wanted was for them to read it. That’s how I’ve come to find joy.

Sad, right?

Maybe. Maybe not.

I let that status sit there for a few days before quietly disappearing from Facebook.

Jerry Seinfeld always mentions that he prefers to talk to comedians, over anyone else. I allows found that strange, until I realized how much I enjoy talking to other bloggers.

We just understand each other. It’s that simple.

Why can’t friends I know in real life be as eager to read my blog as strangers around the world? I mean, there are some friends who are. They’re reading this right now. But it’s a small handful.

So maybe that’s why I chase understanding from people who aren’t in the blogging bubble. Because if I can get that from “outsiders”, then I can truly feel justified in my accomplishment.

The joy never comes from being told I’m featured. Sure, the news always paralyzes me with happiness, but I’m talking about joy.

In this situation, I distinguish happiness and joy in this way: Happiness comes from within. Joy comes when I can share it with others. I don’t know if there’s a dictionary in the world that will support me on that, but no one reads the dictionary anymore, anyway.

The joy comes from people responding to my words, whether they leave a comment, or just think it in their head.

That fills the hole for me.

I have a Twitter account for this blog, though I’ve always been skeptical of its effectiveness.

Whenever I share a post on there, I never feel like I’m reaching anyone new. The only people I’ll reach are bloggers who already follow me on WordPress.

Then I tell myself that hashtags are pointless because you can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make them drink. Sure, people may look up a specific hashtag, but I don’t think many people do so with the intention of clicking a link and reading a blog post.

I may be completely wrong, and stop me if I am, but I feel like there is a lot of truth to what I’m saying.

We live in the “Link in Bio” generation. A lot of us are trying to promote something and send people to it. Our exuberant tweets and captions are over-exaggerated, as we attempt to do (in my mind) the near-impossible task of getting someone to click a link.

It happens all the time on Instagram.

There have been times when I screenshot the introduction of one of my blog posts and put it in my Instagram story. Then I’ll use the social media cliché, “Link in Bio”.

I can see how many people click the link. Maybe one person. Normally zero. That just discourages me from sharing anything again.

So this past weekend I wrote a poem on my blog. I was proud of it, so I took two screenshots and posted the whole thing in an Instagram story. Thus, deleting the need for someone to click on a link.

I don’t know how it went over. I don’t even know if people stopped to read it.

But I took solace in the fact that all the words were in front of them, and if one person read it, then I’d be okay with it.

I get it. I do. I don’t think I’ve ever clicked a link in anyone’s bio on Instagram. It’s not what I’m there to do. If a blogger has shared something, I’ll know to find it on their blog later.

I don’t mean to speak for everyone who tells others to click the link in their bio, but I will.

When we say that, we are optimistic that people care about us enough to read what we wrote.

At the same time, if no one clicks the link, we can lie to ourselves because it’s easy to say, “Oh, they were busy.” Or, “They didn’t see the post because of the algorithm.”

Am I wrong? I’m begging anyone to tell me I’m wrong.

That’s the end of my long-winded story.

So, here I sit in the middle of the night at my desk in the dark. This was one of the rare occasions when my music was on shuffle – not like it mattered, seeing as how I can’t recall any of the songs that actually played.

This is my bubble. This is where my happiness is born. In a few minutes when I press “Publish” and go to sleep, the bubble bursts and you’re all allowed inside, provided that you wipe your boots on the front mat, and you hand me a box of oatmeal chocolate chip cookies upon entry.

That is when I’ll find my joy.

This isn’t about stats. This isn’t about needing people to agree with me. This isn’t even really about me.

This is about words being unable to reach others because clicking a link in someone’s bio feels more like a strict command, than a well-intentioned recommendation.

Like it or not, this is the era we live in.

Welcome to the “Link in Bio” generation.

About Paul

I think of my blog as an all-you-can-read buffet. There's something for everyone and complimentary mints at the door as you leave.
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77 Responses to The “Link in Bio” Generation

  1. Miriam says:

    For what it’s worth I’ve clicked on the few “link in bios” in Instagram posts. But I know what you mean Paul.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Paul says:

      I appreciate the feedback! I feel bad that I don’t because I know how much it would mean to someone to see a referral from there, but at the same time I make a mental not to read their blog later anyway.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Mary Ehlers says:

    Paul, you’re refreshing and amazing. Also, I found this comical because you are funny but also because I literally had just wrote “link in bio” about my new post for an IG story… and it does always feel so cheesy! But I tell myself I must anyways…because that is our generation now. How will I ever get somewhere if I don’t promote myself if that’s how people get there these days? I will click a link in a bio if it’s enticing enough. That said, people these days have the attention spans of goldfish, so maybe that is just me.

    Liked by 3 people

  3. Mary Ehlers says:

    My attention span is pretty short too, so I’m not saying I am any better haha.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Angela says:

    I actually do click on links in bios on Instagram although I totally get it!
    I don’t have my own ‘link in bio’ – I haven’t shared my blog on my facebook or twitter, I’m actually kind of get embarrassed when people I know read it, I’m not sure why?! Im weird!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Paul says:

      I understand that completely! Most of the time when I share on a more personal social media (Facebook and Instagram), I have to talk myself into it for a few hours. I’ll even reach out to a friend to get motivation to post. I guess I just never know how people will silently judge me whenever I post something.

      Liked by 2 people

  5. I read an article once that people are so addicted to social media because the links and comments act like a drug – it’s “the new high”, getting the recognition from others around us? I’m not sure if that really explains what you’re feeling, you seem to go past that point and into a more zen-like state about it, Paul.

    But I understand this too. I don’t publish my blog for friends and family to see. A small handful knows I write a blog but none of them have the link or know what it’s called. I find sharing my blogging joys with fellow bloggers gets a better response – they know the hard work it takes to get to those moments and can appreciate them on a more real level than others who don’t blog.

    Either way, I think you should be uber proud of what you’ve accomplished here! It’s super amazing and you deserve your moments of pure joy over your blogging successes.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Paul says:

      Yeah, I think I’ve stopped caring about getting views, comments, and likes. I just want to know that my words don’t go wasted and people will read them. I guess that sounds like me wanting views, but it’s not for the stat to be large. Am I making any sense?

      That’s a good point about bloggers appreciating our moments on a more real level. I find that non-blog friends don’t really fully understand what being featured means. I guess my audience has really changed since I started blogging. It used to be mainly people I knew in real life. Now it’s 98% bloggers. I guess I’m just chasing that other audience again.

      Thanks for your kind words! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  6. I hear what you are saying about people you know not reading and following your blog. Same for me, several people I know read my blog.
    I think, for me anyway, the most joy comes from finding a way to express and release thoughts and emotions inside me. If someone reads and likes, that is icing on the cake.

    Besides…. you already know we all love you. Like the man said to his wife… I already told you once, do I have to keep saying it??? 😀
    Congrats!!

    Liked by 2 people

  7. micqu says:

    I have never clicked a link in bio, but I left some there too.

    Congratulations on being featured so often. You are doing this blogging thing the right way.
    None of my friends or family members read what I write on here… I am not hidden, I have the link on Facebook, but I guess they don’t care enough to click it. Fun fact: I share links to my blog on Twitter. Usually they generate 0 hits. A regular reader shares the same link and he generates 5 clicks…

    I wish you joy and happiness…

    Liked by 2 people

    • Paul says:

      Thank you, Catherine! I’d like to think that if I didn’t have a blog and one of my friends did, I’d be curious to see what they’re writing about…though I don’t know for sure. Maybe it’s as simple as that. People aren’t curious, or they don’t like to read. Pictures and videos do seem to be more popular…

      Like

  8. m4gical says:

    That bubble is amazing. I used to have exactly the same bubble when I lived back at home but now I no longer have it as I live with my boyfriend so this brang back some good feels. Also I never knew you had an Instagram (probably due to me reading blogs on my phone and not having much time) what is it? I actually like checking out links in bios quite a lot probably because I’m a really nosey person lol. Also congratulations on how much you’ve been featured!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Paul says:

      Yes! Someone else can relate to that bubble! What’s your writing setup now? Do you feel like you have to be alone to blog or…? And thank you!

      Liked by 1 person

      • m4gical says:

        I’ve followed you on my personal too 🙂 my writing set up is pretty much get home from work and get straight on the blog and bring up the notes I’ve thought about on my phone. I have to be alone. Nobody in my real life knows about my blog and I’m not really sure how to tell them

        Liked by 2 people

      • Paul says:

        I saw 🙂 That’s a really cool tattoo! I saw it and thought “this is badass” and then your hashtag was “badassery” hahah. Ahh the notes on the phone. I have a bunch of random thoughts in there that would probably confuse anyone who reads them by accident lol.

        Liked by 1 person

      • m4gical says:

        Thankyou! Haha yeah the notes on the phone, mines just full of blog post ideas and shopping lists lol

        Liked by 2 people

  9. Monika says:

    Thank you for this wonderful and honest post. I can totally relate to your thoughts! I used to share my posts regularly on other social media platforms (for my non-blogging friends) but I stopped doing it because it felt weird to share without getting any response. Like, I knew some friends and probably also acquaintances would read it, but they never said anything and I didn’t really like the feeling of talking to a void. So now I think that people know about my blog and when they’re interested to stay updated it’s easy enough to find it. But on the other hand people do get busy and forget things if they don’t have a little reminder (“link in bio”) every now and then.. I don’t know. Anyways, thank you for making me stop and think about it. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • Paul says:

      “Talking to a void”. That sums it up perfectly! I also think that as bloggers, we’re almost programmed to support each other. While people on the outside just see it as another link on their news feed to scroll past. It’s a different mindset. I’d love to see a focus group about it haha. Thank you for commenting!

      Like

  10. elliefelicity says:

    This post really resonated with me. It’s not fulfilling trying to get people to click, but I still love how easy it is to get my writing out there on the web. Love the phrase “link in the bio generation”. Thanks for sharing

    Liked by 2 people

  11. peckapalooza says:

    I feel like I’ve started using “link in bio” a lot lately. When I’m captioning things on Instagram, “link in bio” comes up as a preprogrammed thing now. My phone has begun to anticipate that I’m gonna use it. I’ve wondered if it does any good. I get likes or follows from people I don’t know based on a lot of those Instagrammable images I’m using to try and point people toward my blog. I don’t know how many of them actually follow the link in my bio. I assume they’re only liking or following because of whatever hashtags I’ve decided to use for a particular image. If they really liked the blog post, they’d probably like that instead. But I’m pretty sure they’re just liking the picture without following the link. I’m starting to think that self promotion may be pointless.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Paul says:

      Oh no, your phone is already anticipating it? I smell a conspiracy. What you just explained is the main reason I don’t bother making my instagram public or starting one for my blog. Feel like most people are just there to tell you they exist, so you go like their stuff. I track who clicks the link by looking at referrals…it never shows up until I test it out to make sure the link it working. Ugh the struggles lol

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Hira says:

    Am only on FB and nothing else. I actually feel like one of those persons who is living under a rock as I do not understand what it means “Link in bio”.. Baah. I only like to read humor and you bring that up anywhere, on any topic, in your every post. This has a bit too 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Paul says:

      Haha ok, on Facebook on Twitter and Instagram, there is a biography section where the person can say stuff about themselves. People with a website normally put a link to their website there so others can click it. Hence, “Link in bio” lol. Thanks for reading, I’m glad you picked up on the humour!

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Little Rants says:

    Actually I never did click on anyone’s “link in bio” blogs. Unless it’s Nykaa (a makeup website) with direct links in their bio that takes me to some new lipstick launch, of course.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Callum says:

    I am a “link in my bio” person. I do it because I’ve come to find that people seldom explore the internet these days, a lot of people (but not everyone) just stick to what they know and are content about it. In the last 5 years since I started blogging on WordPress I have about bugged everyone who’ll actually listen to me about my writing and then I probably bugged them some more. Link in bio gives me a way to get my writing out there without forcing it down someone’s throat.

    I’ve also taken to not actually including a link to a specific post, but instead to the home page go my blog. This way people can come to my blog (if they wish) and in a sense explore what it has to offer allowing them to find something they might like. SURE I do it mainly to get up my view count but I would also like people to come to my blog and enjoy it.

    “Link in my bio” has it’s merits, but like most other things those merits quickly disappear if all people post, tweet or snap about is a link to new content.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Paul says:

      I can relate to you. I feel like I’ve bugged people too much over the years and the link in bio is my way of just leaving it there for them to find. However, I don’t think anyone actually finds it.

      I’ll leave a link to my homepage too, in my bio. But I’ll also share specific posts. I just think people aren’t always in the mood to click something and go read it, especially if they don’t like reading.

      Like

      • Callum says:

        I have an instagram account dedicated to my blog, I’ll post a photo making direct reference to my new post and say “link in my bio” that way they can go there with a specific post in their mind but click something else if that interests them more.

        Like

  15. The truth that rings behind these words is almost deafening! I’m still amazed that you manage to put, quite concisely, how I’m sure every blogger, including myself feels. A fantastic, thought provoking read that was written with finesse. It was funny, but that might be due to the fact that I saw myself in between the lines that were your words. “Link in Bio” is definitely something that I have fallen victim to. I find myself needing other people than the people I know to find pleasure in my work. It is not that I no longer value their opinion but it is almost a guaranteed opinion…if that makes sense? I want other people, that don’t know me to see my work and see me and feel like they know me. That simply doesn’t work for people that already know me..Let me stop rambling now.. lol

    Liked by 1 person

    • Paul says:

      Thanks for the kind words! I completely understand what you’re saying. It’s like…the people who know us are going to be nice and compliment us no matter what we write. I guess we’re just searching for a different audience that can be blunt – and if they’re complimentary, then we know we’ve done something good.

      Like

  16. I think a blog post like this deserves a LOVE button, forget the LIKE. You have so named the elephant in the room- ( and I’ve only been blogging a few months!) Here is what I LOVE :

    –You have the guts to be honest and real

    –You describe what we all want our words to do: Connect with other people–

    I experience joy, too, when I feel my words have 1) said what i meant to say and 2) really connected with another person…(even if I know it is only one or two people)

    So for that reason I write and I’m thankful for the medium of blogging! which allows us to connect more these days…

    I think it’s especially wonderful for those with the gift of humor and sharing about the craziness of life on this planet – like you do.

    If you ever return to FB, look me up and ill share my fabulous family photos…especially my 7 y/0 nephew who is a dynamite minature of young Luke Skywalker and wields a deadly light saber! Watch out Darth Vader….

    Liked by 1 person

    • Paul says:

      What a nice comment! Thank you! I love that feeling when my words resonate with someone else, or I’m able to say what everyone else is thinking, but no one has said out loud before. That gives me joy.

      I guess being featured takes away that built up joy momentarily because then I feel the need to justify it to people who don’t blog.

      Lol your nephew sounds like he’s well on his way to world domination (in a good way)!

      Like

  17. Blunderdad says:

    I’ve felt many the same things you just wrote. I’ve wondered about the why strangers read my posts more than people I know. After thinking about it for many days and often beers. I settled on my blog readership isn’t based on friend or stranger . . . It’s based more on people who like writing and have a blog versus people who don’t and have no reason to enter my blog world when they can clearly see pictures of me and my cat or me and my sushi on Facebook . . . at least this is what I tell myself . . . When I’m alone at night . . . In the dark . . . Writing.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Paul says:

      I think you might be on to something here. I think bloggers understand why other bloggers feel the night to write something and share it, while “outsiders” just see us as ramblers (maybe?). It’s definitely a different audience. Enjoy your dark evenings writing!

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Noor says:

    I thought i’m the only one with the habit of listening to the same song on repeat while writing for hours
    And you are so right, there is something so different about writing at night, i even dedicated a category on my blog and named it “late nights”
    I realized the hole i’v been slipping it lately, the “link in Bio” trap, i decided to stop caring about stats, likes, views or if anyone opened the link i shared on Facebook or not
    I just want to feel the joy of emptying the random thoughts out of my head
    Besides discovering new words, meanings, souls, and connections, all while writing, and i did, and it’s way more joyful or at least meaningful than just getting likes and being featured
    And i found a box of chocolate chip cookies on the table this morning
    Reading about it in your post was kind of weird lol i hope you receive yours soon :3

    Liked by 1 person

    • Paul says:

      Well said. I think late nights are so good for writing because no one else is around and there’s nothing else to do but write or sleep. Haha still no cookies for me but glad you got some!

      Liked by 1 person

  19. Lynni says:

    I think this might be my favourite post you’ve done so far. Actually, I know it is! I feel a little less alone reading this and just want to give you a big hug and tell you how amazing you are – I want you to never feel empty again. I know that emptiness and I know how isolating it can be. But that emptiness only exists as long as you allow it to – fill yourself with the knowledge that every post changes a life. You’re incredible 😊✨

    Liked by 1 person

  20. A lot of bloggers are more interested in the number of likes and comments our blogs get than we are about the actual writing we’re doing. There’s a trap in that; we’re blogging for the wrong reasons, then, unless it’s a blog “business” … and for most of us, it isn’t. Still, we want that attention and those ego strokes. A lot of readers only comment in hopes of leading new readers to their own blogs. How often is there heartfelt communication and discussion following a blog post? It’s sorta disheartening.

    This is an interesting topic; a lot of us would do well to examine our reasons for blogging. For some it’s to feel heard, even if it’s only by one’s self! At least you aren’t in that position; this blog has a lot of followers. You know you’re not shouting into the void!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Paul says:

      You make some great points here. On many occasions, I’ve had bloggers leave comments on my posts just for the sake of me reading their blog, or other people going to it. They didn’t care what I wrote at all. I try to ignore those people as politely as I can.

      That being said, it feels good knowing I’m not shouting into a void and that I’ve created friendships with bloggers to the point where I don’t have to question their intentions. I think that’s how this place should be.

      Thanks for your comment!

      Like

  21. This is just lovely. I am just speechless. Mostly because I know the “emptiness” you are referring to. But I am never brave to discuss that, so thank you big brother for doing it!

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Ely says:

    Damn. This was deep. You’re absolutely right. And I am baffled all the time by the amount of support I get from strangers in comparison to the amount of support I get from people I actually know and hang around with. Sometimes, I feel mocked even… or kind of dumb for doing what I do and finding legitimate relief and happiness from it. We’ve talked about this before- how “non-bloggers” will just never EVERRRR understand. Not even the man I’m going to marry understands! And I’ve come to accept this because I mean…. it’s a lost passion and a rare one! I really loved every word of this post Paul! So eloquent! It really pushes me to write a post without a single curse word in it LOL!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Paul says:

      Thank you, Ely! I feel that way too – mocked and dumb – when I tell others that I blog. Maybe it’s the look on their face that makes me feel that way. It’s like an 18 year telling an adult they have a job and then revealing it’s a lemonade stand. They’ll pretend to be happy for you and will try and understand, but they don’t. A blog post from you without a curse word would probably be put in a museum somewhere!

      Also, when I got the notification from you, there’s no website link under your name and no Follow button like there normally is. Have you been messing with your settings or something?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Ely says:

        Omg that lemonade stand reference!!! Yes!!! People these days are so hard to impress and that’s why we need to stop trying sometimes and just do what we do. Except with cake because if cake isn’t impressive then something is wrong! lol also for the record I did that one post where I was all lit THANK YOU to “writing” for saving me and there’s not one harsh word in there!!!

        And I don’t know what happened to my link thing is it still not looking right?? I went in and took a look and nothing looked crazy? Not sure but that worries me!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Paul says:

        Yes, you did have that swear free post! It was really good too.

        Nope, still unable to click on your name from my notifications. Normally to fix that you have to click on your profile pic in the top right corner, go to Account Settings, and then fill in your web address. Maybe you already did that? I don’t know how else to fix it…

        Liked by 1 person

      • Ely says:

        Thanks! I fixed it!!!! What had happened was- I have a new website/blog now for my cake business that I’m working on! The two got mixed into each other like bad cake batter but now I’ve fixed it.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Paul says:

        Yes! It works! Send me the link to your cake factory whenever you’re ready to show it off!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Ely says:

        Yes I haven’t published because it needs so much work! Lol but it’s gonna be great thank Paul!

        Liked by 1 person

  23. Dutch Lion says:

    I don’t even really understand what “Link in Bio” means. My first thought is I need to read a book about Abraham Lincoln. So I guess this proves that I’m older than you Cap’n, and not of your generation perhaps. Should I be adding my website in my Instagram profile/bio? For what it’s worth, I do link ALL of my WordPress posts to Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Tumblr. I think Tumblr sucks by the way. Congrats on getting featured so many times on WordPress. How do you know when you’re featured? Do you get a message or something? I assume I’ve never been featured. I don’t even know what that means. Man, I got problems! Haha! I need to learn more about all this. Thanks Paul.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Paul says:

      All it means is that people are putting a link in their profile on (insert social media here) and telling people to go click it when they make a post lol.

      WordPress has a page called Discover, which is run by a handful of editors who work for WordPress. Every day they read blog posts and select a few to “feature” on that page which is visible by all bloggers. Sometimes they emailed me to give me the heads up, other times they did it on their own and I noticed when there was a spike in my stats. Haha hope this clears things up!

      Liked by 1 person

  24. Barb Knowles says:

    I almost never click “link in bio” because it’s usually someone trying to sell something in a new and unique way. And, by the way, you are ALWAYS the second person I tell, lol. I tell my husband first, but he almost never reads my blog so usually responds with “Are they paying you?” or “That’s nice.” You respond much better and are the sounding board for my craziness.
    I stare at my stats to an obsessive degree, always. Looking for validation of my writing? Yes. Yes I am.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Pingback: Trying New Things/ Add me on Vero. – Callum R Gibson.

  26. I couldn’t relate more to this blog. I recently started a blog, and getting any views or comments is an uphill task. I blog about topics like incest, divorce, positive sexism, and other topics that I consider genuinely important and often ignored in the larger scheme of things. But what’s the point if no one reads it? I’m so glad you put this out there. Looking forward to the next one!

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